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RECOVERY
SERVICES

"Recovery from a substance use disorder is defined as a process of improved physical, psychological, and social well-being and health after having suffered from a substance-related condition. Individuals may uitilize recovery capital, the resources (social, physical, human and cultural), which are necessary to begin and maintain recovery from substance use disorder."  - Recovery Research Institute

RECOVERY PATHWAYS

There are many different pathways to recovery from alcohol and other drug use disorders including:

  • Clinical Pathways

    • Recovery processes aided by the services of a healthcare provider, clinician, or other credentialed professional.​

  • Non-Clinical Pathways

    • Recovery processes that do not involve a trained clinician, but are often community-based and utilize peer support.​

  • Self-Management Pathways

    • Recovery processes that involve no formal services, sometimes referred to as “natural recovery.”​

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PEER RECOVERY WORKFORCE

Expand peer workforce and programming as interventionists in various settings, including hospitals, emergency departments, law enforcement departments, jails, SUD/OUD treatment programs, and in the community.

Peer Recovery Coaches are typically a non-clinical peer support specialist or “peer mentor” operating within a community organization (e.g., a Recovery Community Center) or a clinical organization (e.g., treatment program or hospital) and can therefore be a paid or volunteer position.

 

Recovery coaches are most often in recovery themselves and therefore offer the lived experience of active addiction and successful recovery. They focus on helping individuals to set & achieve goals important to recovery. They do not offer primary treatment for addiction, do not diagnose, & generally, are not associated with any specific method or pathway to recovery, supporting instead an array of recovery pathways.

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PEER-BASED RECOVERY SUPPORT

Support the development of recovery communities, recovery coaches, and recovery community organizations to expand the availability of and access to recovery support services.

Peer-based recovery support, known as mutual-help organizations (or self-help groups) – are free, peer-led (i.e., non-professional) organizations that developed to help individuals with substance use disorders and other addiction-related problems.

Mutual-help organizations focus on the socially-supportive communication and exchange of addiction and recovery experience and skills. Individuals participate in activities that engage, educate, and support patients recovering from substance use disorder from others facing similar challenges. Mutual help organizations include: Alcoholics Anonymous (AA), Narcotics Anonymous (NA), SMART Recovery, All Recovery groups, and online forums.

RECOVERY RESIDENCES

Support the development of recovery communities, recovery coaches, and recovery community organizations to expand the availability of and access to recovery support services.

Non-medical settings designed to support recovery from substance use disorders, providing a substance-free living environment commonly used to help individuals transition from highly structured residential treatment programs back into their day-to-day lives (e.g., obtaining employment and establishing more permanent residence).

 

Recovery residences support individuals by providing a safe living environment and readily available community of recovery-related social support.